DIY Herb Garden: How to Grow Your Own Dill

 

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If you dilly-dream about dilly beanspickles, or dill-crusted salmon, it’s probably about time to pull it together and create your own DIY herb garden to grow your own fresh dill. You’ll be pickling and dill-ifying your dishes in no time! Nervous about growing plants? Fresh herbs is the best entry to gardening, and you only need a windowsill or patio to get started. We’re here to help.

  • Grab a container full of potting soil and a packet of dill seeds (or, just head over to the Seedsheet store, and pick up your 1 x 3 herb Seedsheet).
  • Scatter a few seeds in your container or lay your Herbsheet down on top of the soil. If you’re planting individual seeds, cover them with a half inch of soil. With the Seedsheet, we’ve already spaced your seeds and included the soil buffer (you're welcome). 
  • Water in your newly planted dill seeds (feel free to sing to them, plants like good vibes). Seeds need to be in contact with moist soil to germinate (sprout), so make sure to keep them moist/wet by watering every morning with a watering can or spray bottle.
  • Your dill plants should sprout within the first week or so! Set your container in a spot where it receives full sun.
  •  Thin to a cluster of 3-6 plants per 6” so they have enough space to branch out. Dill doesn’t need a ton of room, especially if you harvest continuously before they produce flowers and seed.
  • Harvest from your dill plants when the stems have at least 4 leaves (the feathery looking things). Stick to the general rule of thumb with fresh herbs: only cut about ⅓ of each plant at a time so it has enough energy to regenerate and keep producing.

Now that you have your fresh delicious dill fronds, try making one of our favorite (impressive) dill recipes, great for dinner parties:

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