DIY Pollinator Garden: 3 Easy Ways to Attract Pollinators

 

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Grow a Garden to Save the World, DIY Style

 

    It's time to take one for the bees, and plant a DIY pollinator garden. Disappearing pollinators such as bees, butterflies, and other beneficial insects is a hot topic in the news, but it’s hard to picture just how relevant the problem is to our own lives. Think about your breakfast this morning--did you have an apple, coffee, or almonds? These foods all exist because the flowers of each plant had to be pollinated to produce the fruit or seed. Not to mention, bees need pollen to produce honey!

    All of the buzz about pollinator decline is real, with the main contributing factors being pesticides, loss of habitat, climate change and disease. This is a major threat to our global food system, seeing as one out of every three bites of food in the American diet is a product of honey bee pollination. See for yourself: 

Source: Huffingtonpost.com

Source: Huffingtonpost.com

Source: Huffingtonpost.com

Source: Huffingtonpost.com

Enough with the doom and gloom, what can you to to help? An easy solution is to create habitats for beneficial insects. Plant a garden to support pollinators, and grow your own food at the same time. Every plant helps, whether it's just a bucket with one tomato plant on your balcony or an entire backyard filled with flowers, fruit and vegetables.

Here are three easy ways to help boost healthy pollinators:

1. Interplant flowers in your vegetable garden this year. Flowers beautify your garden in ways you may not have imagined and their consistent blossoms encourage pollinator insects to visit. You will see better fruit production from tomato plants that are next to marigolds because more flowers will be noticed by the bees and butterflies. Not only do marigolds attract pollinators to your vegetable plants, but they also protect your tomatoes by trapping unwanted insect pests. Take that, Japanese Beetle!

2. Incorporate plants that flower at different times to feed pollinators throughout the season. Try planting snap peas for early flowers, and then have cucumbers on deck for the next round of blossoms. For varieties like cucumbers that grow low to the ground, the flowers are hidden, so by having other flowering plants in your garden the bees and butterflies will more likely find the hidden cucumber blossoms.

3. Bee-friendly and don't use pesticides or herbicides in your garden. Neonicotinoids are a type of insecticide prevalent in many garden products! Bee-careful of this and other chemical ingredients in gardening products. Use organic, non-treated seeds to save the bees.

If you have a problem with weeds, try using a mulch or landscape fabric to keep unwanted plants out. Herbicides are poisonous to pollinator insects and humans. Lucky for you, Seedsheets contain 100% organic and non-GMO seeds from High Mowing Seeds, as well as a built-in weed barrier fabric so you’ll never have to worry about pesticides (or weeds) in your garden.

Plant a giant flower garden in 30 seconds with the Pollinator Flower Seedsheet

Plant a giant flower garden in 30 seconds with the Pollinator Flower Seedsheet

Vegetables and herbs have flowers too! See if you can spot the cilantro, dill, or peas in this bouquet.

Vegetables and herbs have flowers too! See if you can spot the cilantro, dill, or peas in this bouquet.

Long live the butterflies and the bees!

 

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